Kodaikanal and the Saga of the Devil’s Kitchen

Located  at  almost  seven  thousand  feet  above  the  sea  level,  on  a  highland  over the  southern  escarpment  of  Palani  hills  in  Western  Ghats,  stretching  from  the high  ranges  of  Anaimalai  Hills  in  the  west  to  the  small  hills  in  the  east , stooping steadily  into  the  plains  of  Tamil  Nadu –  Kodaikanal,  a  small  town  in  the Dindigul district,  is  one  of  the  most  popular  hill  stations  of  South  India.

kd

Meadows  flaunting  gardens  of  vibrant  yellow  wild  flowers  sprawl  over  the  valleys,  alongside  scanty  brown  woods,  adorned  with  densely  grown  luscious  red  flowers  of  Rhododendron  trees,  the  faint  pink  of  Magnolia,  and  the  green,  yellow  and  orange  of  tiny  pears,  dangling  from  branches  overhanging  wide  out  from  its  slender  stem,  swaying  gracefully  in the  breeze  blowing  down  the  hillside,  carrying  with  it  a  faint  fragrance  of  the  eucalyptus  trees  that  stand  tall  and  proud  in  the  patches  of  evergreen  forests,  scattered  on  the  grasslands,  separated  from  each  other  like  islands  on  a  fresh,  light   green  sea  of  grass.

Tiny  streams  of  sweet  water  gently  trickling  down  from  the  upper  reach  of  the  ridges,  cross  the  narrow  streets  cut  out  on  the  hills,  and  dribble  down  the  steep  valley  in  untraceable  courses.  On  the  Kodai  road  that  ascends  the  hill  to  Kodaikanal,  about  eight  kilometers  before  the  main  bus-stand,  is  a  perfect  spot  to  behold  the  Silver  Cascade  falls:  the  excess  water  from  the  Kodai  lake  hurling  down  a  hundred  and  eighty  feet  tall  cliff –  crashing  over  the  mighty  boulders  piled  over  each  other,  spattering  the  surrounding  black  rocks  with  white  foam,  leaping  in  jagged  shapes  and  tumbling  down  the  craggy  rock  shelves,  before  plunging  into  the water-pocket  right  beside  the  road.

On  arriving  at  the  bus  stand,  I  picked  up  a  glossy  booklet  for  fifteen  rupees,  titled  “Kodaikanal  Tour  Guide”  in  large  dark  green  letters  over  a  background  that  was  a  digitally  prepared  photo-montage  of  various  tourist  attractions  in  town.  “Tour  guide..  tour  guide”,  then  another  coarse  competitive  voice  –  “best  tour  guide!”,  “rooms..  rooms..  rooms”,  “home  made  chocolates”,  “freshest  honey”,  “grow  hair  in  two  months  guarantee..  herbal  oil..  grow hair in..”,  “cheap  and  best”,  “A-1  quality!”,  and  other  sounds  of  selling  clattered  around  bus  stand.

I  started  up  the  road  towards  a  small  stall,  sniffing  for  coffee,  and,  “rooms..  rooms..  rooms”,  came  a  short  plump  middle-aged  man  with  dark  face  and  a  bright  white  cap,  jostling  his  way  through  a  group  of  tourists  and  asked,  “rooms?”,  raising  his  brows  and  pointing  his  finger  at me.  “How  much?”,  I  asked. “200  only”,  he  said,  “the  best  quality  you  can  find”.  “With  hot  water?”,  I  asked,  and  tossing  his  head  back  and  drawing  his  brows  together,  “huh?”,  he  said  with  genuine  bewilderment.  “Does  these  best  quality  rooms  for  200  rupees  a  day  have  hot  water  supply?”,  I  asked,  pronouncing  each  word  slowly  and  carefully. “No  no”,  he  said  with  a  creeping  disappointment  on  his  face,  “no  rooms..  no  rooms”,  and  walked  away  nodding  his  head,  to  where  he  was  standing  before  and  started  chanting  ‘rooms’  again.  I  watched  him  curiously,  wondering  what  exactly  he  found  strange,  or  perhaps  offensive,  about  a  traveler  expecting  hot  water  supply  on  a  hill  station,  in  December,  when  the  temperatures  range  from  8  to  14  degree  centigrade,  with  short  spanned  afternoon downpours that  cools  off  the  little  heat  absorbed  from  the  noon  sun.

I  found  out  later  from  the  shop  keeper,  who  sold  me  a  steaming  glass  of  robust,  locally  grown  coffee,  that  “rooms”  is  a  code  word  for,  “shrooms”- which  apparently  is  a  word  used  in  hipster  circles  to  refer  to  hallucinogenic  mushrooms  called  psilocybes,  known  on  street  as  magic  mushrooms,  which  he  was  selling  at  200  rupees  a  dozen:  allegedly  the  standard  doze  to  hallucinate.

I  read  in  the  booklet  about  Bryant  park,  that  boasted  of  325  species  of  trees,  shrubs  and  cactuses,  740  varieties  of  rose,  a  Eucalyptus  tree  standing  since  1857,  and  a  Bodhi  tree,  all  spread  out  over  20.5  acres  of  botanical  garden,  built  in  1908  by  H  D  Bryant;  about  Coaker’s  walk  –  a  kilometer  long  pavement  along  the  steep  southern  slopes,  from  where,  if  not  engulfed  by  thick  clouds,  one  can  relish  the  panoramic  valley  view;  about  Kodaikanal  Solar  Observatory,  from  where  John  Evershed  had  discovered  the  radial  motion  of  sunspots –  named  after  him  as  Evershed  effect;  about  the  Bear  Shola  falls,  that  is  named  after  the  bears  that  once  used  to  frequent  the  place  to  drink  water;  about  Dolphin’s  nose,  kodai  lake,  pillar  rocks,  Silver  cascade;  and  not  finding  what  I  was  there  for,  tossed  the  booklet  in  a  trash  can  after  sipping  the  last  drops  of  coffee,  and  asked  the  man  who  was  standing  next  to  a  bus  that  had  just  arrived,  relentlessly  proclaiming  himself  a  “Tour  Guide”,  if  he  could  take  me  to  the  Devil’s  kitchen.  “It  is  closed  for  public.  Too  dangerous”,  he  said,  “but  I  can  to  take  you   to  Kukkal  caves.  It  is..”.  “Never  mind”,  I  said  and  started  up  the  hill,  not  sure  about  the  next  plan  of  action.

A  young  Good  Samaritan,  probably  in  his  late  teens,  rode  me  on  his  motorbike,  in  less  than  5  minutes,  to  Kodai  lake,  where  he  said  I  had  the  best  chances  of  finding  someone  who  can  take  me  to  Guna  caves  –  the  popular  name  for  Devil’s  kitchen  after  it  was  made  famous  by  the  movie  ‘Guna’:  a  tale  of  a  mentally  unstable,  romantic  kidnapper  who  abducts  his  lover  to  this  cave.

Kodaikanal  lake  is  a  roughly  star-shaped,  man-made  lake  spreading  over  an  area  of  60  acres,  which  is  large  enough  to  make  it  difficult  to  notice  the  star  shape  at  the  first  glance,  unless  viewed  from  a  higher  vantage  in  one  of  those  thick  evergreen  forests  on  the  hills  surrounding  the  lake  on  all  sides.  The  area  was  a  vast  marsh,  flooded  by  various  streams  flowing  from  the  upper  regions  of  the  surrounding hills  obscured  by  squiggly  opaque  clouds  for  most  part  of  the  day, until  1863  when  Vera  Levinge,  a  retired  district  collector  of  Madhurai  who  had  settled  in  Kodaikanal,  built  strong  embankments  around  and  transformed  the  marsh  into  this  lake  –  so  I  learnt  by  sneaking  behind  a  tour  guide  and  stealing  some  knowledge  he  was  imparting  to  a  group  of  tourists  who  had  hired  him.

Couples  in  pedal  boats,  families  and  friends  in  row  boats,  and  families  with  slightly  heavier  wallets  in  gondola-like  boats  roofed  with  artfully  embroidered,  bright  coloured  canvas  tarpaulin,  sailed  serenely  across  the  water,  shimmering  under  the  slanting  rays  of  the  late-morning  sun.  Lotuses  were  in  full  bloom  in  corners  of  the  lake,  where  water  was  not  frequently  disturbed  by  boats.  Kids  and  middle  aged  couples  rode  extended,  three  wheeled,  two-seater  bicycles  with  two  handlebars  and  pedals –  hired  at  the  bicycle  club  –  on  the  finely  tarred,  5  kilometer  long  peripheral  road,  lined  on  either  side  with  pushcarts  selling  Samosas,  fruit  juice,  chocolates,  eucalyptus  oil,  handicrafts,  T-shirts  etc.

The  next  hour  I  spent  fruitlessly,  walking  around  the  lake  and  asking  localites,  boatmen,  hawkers,  and  the  manger  and  waiters  in  the  restaurant  where  I  gobbled  a  breakfast  of  idly-vada,  if  they  knew  someone  who  could  get  me  into  those  caves.  On  my  second  attempt,  I  asked  a  boatman  who  was  sitting  ideally  in  a  row-boat  lashed  to  a  thick  wooden  log  shoved  into  the  ground  skirting  the  lake,  presumably  just  after  labouring  the  paddles,  for  tiny  beads  of  sweat  shone  on  his  forehead.  Like  all  others  I   had  asked,  he  religiously  narrated  the  story  of  12  youths  who  disappeared  into  the  caves. “None  of  their  bodies  were  found  in  spite  of  expensive  rescue  operations”,  he  said,  before  telling  me  that  the  area,  fenced  and  guarded  by  forest  department,  is  not  open  for  public.  “But  there’s  got  to  be  someone  who  knows  a  way  around  the  fence  and  guards,  right?”,  I  asked.  Seeing  me  from  the  corner  of  his  eyes,  he  spread  a  smile  on  his  face  and  said,  “Meet  me  in  the  evening.”

I  noted  his  cell  number  and  started  up  the  street,  ascending  the  hill  to  the  west  of  lake;  and  after  a  kilometer  or  so,  deviated  left  on  a  narrow  pathway  of  cobblestone  that  wound  up  the  grassy  ridge  to  a  single  storey  rectangular  house  –  with  light  gray  coloured  walls  and  sloping  roof  of  corrugated  clay  tiles  –  where  I  rented  the  room  on  the  first  floor  for  150  rupees  a  day,  from  the  old,  soft-spoken  landlady  who  lived  downstairs.  It  was  a  simple  room  with  a  double  bed,  electric  heater,  a  clean  bathroom;  hill  view  from  the  rear  window,  and  from  the  balcony,  a  vast  valley  view,  which  was  not  panoramic,  but  nevertheless,  vast  enough  to  please  my  spatial  sensibilities.  I  took  a  long  hot  shower,  chomped  the  rice  and  dal  kindly  offered  by  the  landlady,  and  slept  warm  under  the  woolen  blanket  that  was  neatly  spread  out  on  the  bed  sheet.

kd 1

Back  at  the  lake  in  the  evening,  the  boatman  told  me  that  he  had  arranged  everything  for  the  next  morning.  “Will  cost  you  5000”,  he  said.  That  was  about  twice  the  amount  I  had  spent  on  the  entire  trip:  food,  stay,  travel,  liquor,  all  put  together.  Evidently  he  had  mistaken  me  for  one  of  those  well-fed,  well-scrubbed  tourists,  from  whom  the  largest  portion  of  Kodai’s  revenue  is  generated.  “5000!  Come  on”,  I  said, “ you  are  not  taking  me  to  paradise.  5000  is  too  much  for  a  devil’s  kitchen.”  He  told  that,  even  amoung  the  localites,  there  were  very  few  who  knew  that  place  well  enough  to  slip  by  the  guards  and  make  it  through  the  caves  alive  –  probably  hoping  that  I,  presumably  having  studied  basic  economics  101,  will  understand  that  the  shortage  of  supply  accounted  for  the  high  price.  “Never  mind”,  I  said,  “I’ll  make  it  in  by  myself”,  with  the  air  of  a  man  grossly  over-estimating  his  abilities.  “Many  young  folks  make  it  into  those  caves  every  year”,  he  said,  in  a  voice  that  had  suddenly  grown  gruff  and  proud  as  I  turned  my  back  on  him  and  started  walking  away,  adding, after  an  intelligently  timed  pause,  “few  make  it  out”,  in  a  gentle and polite  voice  again.

After  almost  an  hour  of  aimlessly  wandering  around  the  town ,  stopping  strangers  on  streets  and  asking  if  they  could  take  me  to  guna  caves,  a  local  taxi  driver  told  he  me  that  a  man  named  Yash,  who  had  recently  returned  back  to  Kodaikanal,  his  hometown,  after  working  for  two  years  in  Chennai,  had  been  looking  for  someone  to  accompany  him  there.  I  asked  if  Yash  had  been  there  before.   He  told  me  that  on  his  previous  attempt  he  had  to  turn  back  from  half  way  through,  but  this  time  he  intends  to  go  all  the  way.  “But  no  worry.  He  takes  firangs  (Indian  word  for  ‘foreigners’  usually  used  to  refer  to  whites)  on  long  guided  treks.”  That  was  not  the  most  satisfactory  assurance  of  his  credibility,  but  he  wasn’t  charging  me  any  money,  which  was  important  for  I  did  not  have  much  of  it.

Excitement  and  anxiety  levels  were  too  high  that  night  to  have  a  good  sleep,  in  spite  of  the  few  drinks  I  had  in  the  balcony  of  the  room  I’d  hired,  gazing  Orion  and  Gemini  that  hung  in  the  clear  sky  over  the  valley,  through  which  sailed  thick  clouds,  giving  a  mysterious  appeal  to  the  hazy  gorge  below.  “Many  young  folks  make  it  into  those  caves  every  year …  few  make  it  out”  –  those  words  rang  in  my  head  for  hours  as  I  lay  on  the  bed,  twitching  and  turning  with  jolts  of  fright  that  was  perfectly  blended  with  a  sense  of  excitement  that  one  feels  just  before  beginning  the  descend  into  the  darkness  of  a  widely  feared  abyss,  known  to  have  consumed  most  of  those  who  dared  into  its  depths.

The  next  morning,  after  a  light  breakfast  of  bread  omelette  and  coffee,  meandering  my  way  down  the  slope  on  the  cobblestone  pathway  from  the  house  to  the  street  below,  I  met  Yash –  a  short,  fair  and  lean  fellow  in  his  late  twenties,  with  neatly  cropped  hair  –  who  had  arrived  punctually  at  7:00am  on  his  blue  Hero-Honda  CBZ,  customized  with  extra  wide  tires  and  an  awkwardly  huge  fairing,  which,  far  as  I  could  see,  served  no  function  other  than  slowing  down  this  modest  150cc  and  reducing  its  fuel  efficiency.

We  rode  downhill  to  the  junction  that  connects  to  the  lake’s  peripheral  road  and  turned  right  on  the  observatory  road,  before  deviating  left,  a  couple  of  kilometers  before  the  observatory,  on  a  slippery  slush  of  a  narrow  untarred  lane  leading  to  the  Upper  Shola  road,   where  we  turned  a  sharp  right  and  raced  south,  passing  the  Golf  club,  and  parked  the  bike  alongside  the  various  stalls  selling  ice-creams,  chaats,  fruits,  salads  etc,  on  a  road  lined  with  pine  trees  on  either  side.

Hiking  through  the  pine  forests  on  the  left –  where  groups  of  tourists  sat  on  carpets  spread  out  on  the  clear  spaces  in  between  the  trees,  talking,  eating  and  laughing,  with  their  backs  rested  against  the  towering  conifers –  we  reached  the  thick  evergreen  forests  on  the  upper  regions  of  the  hill,  where  snarling  cypress  roots  on  the  ground  made  the  climb  slightly  tricky,  but   nevertheless,  gave  a  firm  footing  on  the  steep  slopes.  “You  wanna  check  out  the  view  from  the  top,  before  going  into  the  cave?”,  asked  Yash.  “Sure”,  I  said.  We  climbed  to  the  roof  of  the  pillar  rocks –  three  magnificent  granite  rock  boulders,  rising  500ft  from  the  valley,  supporting  each  other  shoulder  to  shoulder –  to  behold  the  panorama.  But  up  there,  in  the  impenetrable  whiteness  of  the  thick  clouds  that  hung  on  the  peak  and  showed  no  signs  of  having  any  intentions  to  move,  we  were  blinded  more  hopelessly  than  we  could  possibly  be  in  the  darkness  of  a  moonless  night.

Climbing  hills  and  trekking  through  the  forests  in  the  night  has  always  been  a  fascinating  experience,  but  pillar  rocks  is  one  of  the  places  I  wouldn’t  dare  in  the  moonlight,  for  I  do  not  want  to  slip  into  one  of  those  dark,  apparently  harmless  ditches,  that  the  tour  guide  warns  the  tourists  to  stay  away  from,  with  a  simple  but  effective  demonstration:  he  tosses  a  wooden  stick  into  the  hole,  and  as  the  tourists  watch  the  stick  disappear  in  the  darkness  with  horrified  eyes,  asks  them  to  wait  till  they  hear  it  hit  the  bottom.  Cannot  remember  the  exact  count,  but  certainly  took  over  seven  seconds.  These  are  deep  ravines  that  drop  vertically  for  hundreds  of  feet,  straight  into  the  devil’s  kitchen.  Though  wikitravel  says  there  is  a  90%  chance  of  suffering  a  fatal  fall  while  attempting  to  explore  guna  caves,  many  have  made  it  back  alive.  But  no  one  who  took  the  shortcut,  through  one  of  these  ravines  found  all  over  the  roof  of  pillar  rocks,  saw  light  again.

kdd

Descending  along  the  northern  slope  of  pillar  rocks  for  about  20  minutes,  we  arrived  at  a  vertical  drop  of  allegedly  300  feet, skirted  by  slippery  loam  on  all  sides,  with  tall  barbed  fences  surrounding  the  area.  Tourists  of  all  age  groups  moved  in  and  out  of  the  three  openings,  cut  out  in  the  fence.  “Where  are  the  guards?”,  I  asked.  “You  kidding  me?”,  said  Yash,  with  a  sneering  chuckle.  Entering  through  one  of  the  openings  and  meandering  down  the  north-east  facing  slope,  we  arrived  at  a  pile  of  boulders,  where  most  of  the  tourists  clicked  photographs  and  returned  back.  At  the  foot  of  the  pile  was  the  entrance,  where  a  group  of  college  students  frantically  screamed  “Abhiraami”,  looking  into  the  caves.  “Is  someone  lost  in  there?”,  I  asked.  “Oh  no.  Abhiraami  is  the  name  of  the  lead  actress  in  the  movie  guna.  They  are  imitating  a  scene  from  the  movie.”  There  were  no  guards  the  keep  these  folks  from  bouldering  down  the  approximately  30ft  drop,  and  making  it  to  the  mouth  of  the  cave,  but  the  saga  of  devil’s  kitchen  seemed  enough  to  keep  the  enthusiasts  in  line.

kdd1

We  shinned  down  the  drop  at  the  entrance  –  jamming  the  right  hand  fingers  in  a  fissure  on  the  rock  face,   clutching  the  chunks  protruding  from  the  boulder-stone  with  the  left,  and  carefully  placing  the  tips  of  our  shoes  on  the  slits  and  cracks –  and  half  way  down the drop,  we  leaped  to  another  boulder  on  our  left,  from  where  Yash  gracefully  pranced  across  the  smaller  rocks  with  nimble  feet,  and  with  one  giant  leap,  hunkered  down  on  one  of  the  uneven  shelves  formed  on  one of the three  pillar  rocks  that  walled  the  cave  on  the  right.  I  followed,  but  not  quite  with  the  same  agility  and  confidence.

Treading  sideways,  cautiously  placing  foot  after  foot  on  the  unsteady  shelves  of  the  rock,  struggling  to  balance  my  body  on  my  knees  that  was  trembling  with  fear  and  strain,  I  climbed  down  the  wall  to  the  ground,  and  followed  Yash  into  the  mouth  of  the  cave,  trudging  over  the  slushy  ground  in  which  the  bottom  half  of  our  shoes  were  immersed.   Noticing  the  ripples  in  the  ground  as  we  stepped  over  it,  Yash  stopped  suddenly  and  saw  me  over  his  shoulder  with  wide  terrified  eyes.  Picking  up  a  long  wooden  stick  that  was  at  least  one  and  a  half  times  my  height,  presumably  dropped  from  the  ravines  on  the  roof  by  the  tour  guide,  he  said,  “It  is  wise  to  check  for  the  firmness  of  the  ground  before  stepping  over  it”,  adding,  “especially  after  the  monsoon”.  He  carefully  examined  the  ground  by  shoving  the  stick  into  it  before  every  step.  We  had  hardly  taken  ten  steps  when  the  stick  went  all  the  way  into  the  ground  without  much  effort.

“All  right!”,  he  said,  “gimme  a  hand”,  waving  me  to  a  thick  long  wooden  log  that  lay  behind  us,  near  the  entrance  just  below  the  drop.  We  lifted  it  up,  each  holding  one  end,  and  dropped  it  across  the  quicksand,  bridging  the  farthest  point  the  stick  test  allowed  us  to  go,  to  the  visibly  firm  rocky  ground  adjoining  the  giant  boulder  which  walled  the  cave  on  the  left.   “So,  you  know  whats  the  first  thing  you  do  if  you  slip  into  the  quicksand?”,  he  asked.  “Panic?”,  I  said  with  all  honesty  and  innocence.

“Ah!  You  don’t  want  to  do  that.  Quicksands  are  not  killers  in  themselves.  It  is  the  hysterical  beating  of  hands  and  legs  out  of  panic,  that  liquifies  the  quicksand  and  sinks  those  stuck  inside.  Just  breathe  deep  and  calm,  and  expose  a  large  area  of  your  body  by  lying  on  your  back.  That  will  keep  you  afloat”,  he  said.  Most  quicksands  are  only  about  two  feet  deep,  but  at  this  altitude,  in  a  deep  ravine  formed  between  two  large  boulders  by  deposition  of  the  soil  run  down  from  the  peaks  by  rain  water,  devil  knows  how  many  tens  or  hundreds  of  feet  of  depth  it  could  reach?

kdd2

Clenching  one  end,  he  gave  me  the  dirty  end  of  the  stick  he  had  shoved  into  the  ground,  to  hold  on  while  walking  sideways  on  the  wooden  log;  so  that,  just  in  case  one  of  us  slipped  in,  the  other  could  pull  the  unlucky  one  out  of  the  trap  using  the  stick,  presuming  that  both  would  not  slip  in  together.  On  reaching  the  firm  ground  at  the  end  of  the  log,  we  proceeded  further  into  the  cave  and  rested  on  a  rock,  lighting  a  cigarette,  which  I  smoked  in  silent  contemplation  of  our  conquests  so  far,  and  an  anxious  anticipation  of  what  else  the  Devil  had  in  store  for  us  in  the  darkest  parts  of  his  kitchen  that  lay  ahead.  After  a  relatively  easy  climb  up  a  rock,  the  cave  shrank  into  a  narrow  tunnel,  where  not  a  single  beam  of  the  sun’s  rays  could  reach  –  neither  the  slanting  rays  when  it  shone  in  the  horizon,  nor  the  vertical  rays  from  the  zenith;  neither  in  summer,  nor  in  winter.  It  was  a  place  of  eternal  darkness  (except for  the  occasional  torch  light  shined  by  those  that  ventured  into  the  caves,  making  it  across  the  quicksand).

kdd3

I  shoved  my  body,  headfirst  into  the  hole  with  the  cellphone  torch  in  my  mouth,  and  crawled  over  my  stomach  and  chest,  pulling  myself  up  the  sloping  tunnel  by  gripping  the  sides  with  hands  and  feet. Yash  followed  right  behind.  The  thought  of  finding  a  python  in  this  hole,  that  was  so  small  that  there  was  not  enough  space  to  even  crawl  on  my  knees,  let  alone  maneuver  or  turn  back,  suddenly  crossed  my  mind,  making  me  terribly  uncomfortable  and  claustrophobic.  Carrying  the  cellphone  in  my  mouth,  I  was  salivating.  So  I  wiped  the  phone  to  my  T-shirt,  and  carrying  it  in  my  hand,  I  slogged  the  next  ten  minutes  without  covering  much  distance,  for  the  upward  slope  had  increased  sharply,  making  the  climb  slow  and  tiring.

Further  narrowing  of  the  hole  as  we  kept  on  crawling,  made  us  worry  about  getting  stuck  in  a  place  from  where  we  can  neither  proceed  nor  head  back  the  way  we  came.  It  was,  of  course,  already  too  late  to  head  back.  Just  when  I  had  started  wondering  where  this  tunnel  would  lead  us  to,  and  whether  it  was  a  mistake  to  crawl  into  a  hole  without  knowing  where,  and  if,  it  opened  on  the  other  end,  I  was  reassured  by  the  wind,  gently  blowing  down  the  tunnel,  that  I  had  almost  made  it  to  the  other  end.  This  reassurance  boosted  both  our  morales,  and  with  revived  energy,  we  hurriedly  scrambled  the  last  few  meters,  and  Voila! –  “light  in  the  end  of  the  tunnel.”

The  sight  of   light  had  given  me  a  confirmation  that  we  were  making  it  out  this  place  alive,  but  with  it  came  a  feeling  of  disappointment  with  the  sudden  realization  that  this  place,  like  all  other  places  that  had  gained  a  legendary  status,  has  been  over-estimated  and  over-feared.  Apart  from  the  quicksand,  I  could  see  no  other  explanation  for  the  mysterious  disappearances  in  this  cave.  At  the  end  of  the  tunnel,  we  put  our  heads  out  of  one  of  those  many  dark  ditches,  into  the  familiar  bright  world  with  green  trees  and  blue  sky  again.

Resting  beside  the  hole  we  had  crawled  out  of,   I  pointed  to  the  three  leaches  that  had  bloated  on  the  blood  they  were  sucking  out  of  my  left  hand.  “Don’t  be  surprised”,  he  said  in  a  disinterested  tone,  focusing  hard  with  drawn  brows  on  the  leech  he  was  pulling  out  from  in between  his  fingers. “Remove  your  shoes  and  look  for  more.”

Advertisements